We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan

We Come Apart

From two acclaimed authors comes an emotional story told in verse about friendship, love, and overcoming unbeatable odds.Authors Brian Conaghan and Sarah Crossan have joined forces to tell the story of Nicu and Jess, two troubled teens whose paths cross in the unlikeliest of places.Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhi...

Title:We Come Apart
Author:
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Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:320 pages

We Come Apart Reviews

  • Laura
    Dec 12, 2016

    is a very heartbreaking novel beautifully written in verse about friendship and love. The themes of immigration, racism, abuse, and bullying are all very prominent to the story as well. It is a quick read that took me no more than a couple hours. The characters are strong, well-developed and real. While I felt em

    is a very heartbreaking novel beautifully written in verse about friendship and love. The themes of immigration, racism, abuse, and bullying are all very prominent to the story as well. It is a quick read that took me no more than a couple hours. The characters are strong, well-developed and real. While I felt emotions and was invested in the story, I'm still not sure what the authors were trying to say. I can certainly enjoy verse in novels. I loved

    by

    , but the verse worked more effectively there. It didn't add anything to the story here. And it made things a little more difficult with Nicu's narration since his was written in broken English to begin with. Some passages did feel very powerful like this one:

    The story follows two troubled teens whose lives come together in a Reparation scheme they were both put in to avoid criminal records. It is basically community service and self-development sessions. Nicu and his parents emigrated from Romania to England. They are here to earn enough money to pay the family of a bride in Romania and marry Nicu off. Jess lives with her mom and abusive stepdad. Both characters feel stuck in their lives, but when they meet...their lives will change.

    I love the ending for all it's ambiguity. It would have been nice if there was more of a clear-cut message to take away when such important themes were being discussed. Also, I started the story very confused while trying to figure out who was narrating when. There aren't any names at the beginning or labels on the chapters to let you know who exactly is starting. Once I figured it out, it was fairly obvious. If you enjoy quick stories about friendship that will quite possibly break your heart, you might want to read

    .

  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    Jan 17, 2017

    It follows two unlikely friends as they meet and get to know each other as a part of a juvenile reform course due to both Nicu and Jess being caught shoplifting. Nicu has recently emigrated to the UK from Romania and Jess lives in an unsafe and abusive home.

    As this book isn't officially released yet, I'll just list the things that really stuck out for me:

    It follows two unlikely friends as they meet and get to know each other as a part of a juvenile reform course due to both Nicu and Jess being caught shoplifting. Nicu has recently emigrated to the UK from Romania and Jess lives in an unsafe and abusive home.

    As this book isn't officially released yet, I'll just list the things that really stuck out for me:

    - the look into Nicu's mind as he navigates his way in a new country and how hard it is to be in an unfamiliar environment and having to learn a new language, especially when no one gives you a chance (as is often the case in this book).

    - It's also a glance behind those kids who act up in class. I often always thought as a kid, 'Why don't they just stop and do what they're told? Why are they so naughty?' etc., when there is ALWAYS a reason, even if it isn't always apparent to you. Having a look inside Jess's mind on why she did the things that she did was incredibly eye-opening.

    - the way that teachers treated Nicu was absolutely despicable. Not even giving him the time of day, not even a smile and always assuming the worst of him was absolutely heartbreaking to read. A teacher can literally make or break a student.

    - It's told in dual perspective and in verse, and to be honest it felt like the wrong format. I honestly don't understand why it was told in verse and it certainly didn't bring anything to the table for me.

    - Another thing I was unsure about was the writing from Nicu's perspective. It felt almost wrong to be reading the disjointed English and the innermost thoughts of Nicu when he was written by a white man (I'm assuming Brian wrote Nicu). I'm still unsure how I feel about this because while the message of the book is super important, it just felt a little weird to me if that makes sense.

    - The ending was absolutely gut-wrenching. Prepare yourself.

  • Cait (Paper Fury)
    Jan 23, 2017

    Maaaaybe that's just me, so AS ALWAYS, I encourage you to read it for yourself! It's basically by two teens who have awful lives and what they choose to do about it. But their decisions made about as much sense as as the existence of marmalade. (Spoiler: there is no point in marmalade.)

    ANYWAY.

    It's dual narrated. In verse. And doth not deign to tell m

    Maaaaybe that's just me, so AS ALWAYS, I encourage you to read it for yourself! It's basically by two teens who have awful lives and what they choose to do about it. But their decisions made about as much sense as as the existence of marmalade. (Spoiler: there is no point in marmalade.)

    ANYWAY.

    It's dual narrated. In verse. And doth not deign to tell me who's speaking when. No chapter headings. Noooooooooooothing. So like it took me a long time to figure out half of it is by Nicu (who's a POC immigrant from Romania to England) and half by Jess (who is a teenage delinquent from an abusive family). BUT WHY WAS IT SO FREAKING HARD TO LABEL THE CHAPTERS???? And sometimes they'd

    narrate in the one chapter so just excuse me while my brain skydives off the edge of the world.

    So at least that differentiated him from Jess. But still. #help.

    Well Nicu was

    . And he had so many struggles! With feeling out of place because of his skin colour, and not speaking much English, and just being attacked hugely because he's different. But he was sweet and happy and took risks to make friends with someone who was like a cold iceblock of Alaska. (Aka Jess.)

    Like her character development was good? But she was really a brat. She had a really really bad home life so I don't want to be dismissive of that...but I found it hard to root for her.

    People can be disgusting honestly.

    That's just me though. Verse/poetry has suited me exactly 0% since the day I was born. I probably wasn't given enough Mozart to listen to as a small child tbh. I just miss the details of world building and the descriptions of characters and emotions and things. #sadface

    Erm....what and why.

    Character development was A+ and I think the world should pause and hug Niku because he is a precious little cupcake who knows the way to make friends is to offer them chocolate (#winning at life, Niku). It talks about how horrible the world can be. BUT!! It does talk about the power of friendship and love and I like READ IT ALL IN AN HOUR BECAUSE: INVESTED.

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