Midnight at the Electric by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Midnight at the Electric

Divided by time. Ignited by a spark.Kansas, 2065. Adri has secured a slot as a Colonist—one of the lucky few handpicked to live on Mars. But weeks before launch, she discovers the journal of a girl who lived in her house over a hundred years ago, and is immediately drawn into the mystery surrounding her fate. While Adri knows she must focus on the mission ahead, she become...

Title:Midnight at the Electric
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0062393545
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages

Midnight at the Electric Reviews

  • Laura
    Jun 08, 2017

    I went into this for all the wrong reasons. If you're looking for a multigenerational YA contemporary read, this is for you. If the science fiction elements are the draw for you, you may be disappointed. I wasn't particularly in the mood for this slower sort of read about loss, relationships and friendship. And I'm sure it didn't help that I never felt a connection to the characters.

    Three stories are told tied together by one common character: Galapagos, the tortoise. In 2065, Adri has been sele

    I went into this for all the wrong reasons. If you're looking for a multigenerational YA contemporary read, this is for you. If the science fiction elements are the draw for you, you may be disappointed. I wasn't particularly in the mood for this slower sort of read about loss, relationships and friendship. And I'm sure it didn't help that I never felt a connection to the characters.

    Three stories are told tied together by one common character: Galapagos, the tortoise. In 2065, Adri has been selected to be one of the colonists living on Mars. She moves to live with a distant cousin in Kansas while she completes her final trainings. Adri discovers the journal of Catherine, a girl living during the Dust Bowl in Oklahoma 1934, and letters from Lenore, an English girl coming to terms with the loss of her brother in World War I (1919).

    While I was fascinated by Adri's storyline because of the destruction of the earth by climate change, the need to put colonists on Mars. It's really all very intriguing how the future is imagined here, though it isn't very expansive. We don't get very much detail on the future of the world, so I wouldn't read the book for only this storyline. We also don't see any of the colonization on Mars.

    I enjoyed the atmosphere within Catherine's story. The Dust Bowl setting was excellent. You could feel the suffocation of the dust and the overall bleak tone the Great Depression brings.

    If only the story wasn't so slow moving. While some of the settings worked for me, I never connected to the characters. I almost stopped reading, but was curious if I'd get

    from the settings. Plus it is a fairly short read, so no harm there. It seems I didn't feel the emotion I should have from the story. Oops.

  • Emily May
    Jan 03, 2017

    . Anderson is the author of one of my favourite YA books of all time -

    - making her someone whose books are auto-buys for me. And

    didn't disappoint.

    I feel like I should issue a warning that those going into this book should prepare themselves for a slow, gentle, b

    . Anderson is the author of one of my favourite YA books of all time -

    - making her someone whose books are auto-buys for me. And

    didn't disappoint.

    I feel like I should issue a warning that those going into this book should prepare themselves for a slow, gentle, but emotional read. Anderson fans will expect this after reading both

    and

    . There is something so haunting and all the more effective about the subtle way these stories unfold.

    The author reveals powerful concepts and insights into humanity through the quiet interactions between people, and their private thoughts. When she retells

    , the focus is on the inner turmoil of a young girl and the heartache that comes with growing up, changing, and not having things turn out how you'd hoped. When she tells this story about a Mars colonist in the year 2065, the focus is not on space travel and the future, but on the deep sadness of leaving something behind, and the excitement of experiencing something new.

    Though the book starts with Adri - an orphan who has been chosen as one of the first colonists on Mars - it actually tells three different stories. Adri has been sent to live with her distant and aging cousin, Lily, while she prepares for her new life, but in Lily's home she discovers the diaries of a girl called Catherine who lived during the Dust bowl of 1930s America, and letters to Catherine's mother from Lenore, an English girl who lost her beloved brother in the First World War.

    All of these stories are tied together by Galapagos, a tortoise that has appeared in the lives of all three women. And all three women are on the cusp of leaving - Lenore leaving England; Catherine leaving her dust-covered town and the boy she loves; Adri leaving Earth. The book is infused with melancholy... because there is something very sad about change and leaving, even new beginnings are tinged with the sadness of that left behind.

    The book is

    . It is strange how a book that has such a sad atmosphere can be somehow hopeful and uplifting at the same time. It contains all the bittersweetness of something ending, and something else beginning.

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  • Sarah
    Mar 14, 2017

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)

    This was a YA story about a girl leaving for Mars, who finds an old relatives letters and reads them.

    Adri was quite a prickly character, and she really didn’t seem to like being around people much at all. I did understand her ne

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)

    This was a YA story about a girl leaving for Mars, who finds an old relatives letters and reads them.

    Adri was quite a prickly character, and she really didn’t seem to like being around people much at all. I did understand her need to find out how things ended though, and I was pleased that she began to appreciate people a bit more towards the end of the book.

    The storyline in this was about Adri going to stay with a distant cousin whilst training to go live on Mars, and finding some old personal letters in the room she was staying in. These letters then gave us the stories of Catherine - who lives in Oklahoma in 1934, and Lenore - who lives in England in 1919. Catherine was worried about her younger sister who had dust pneumonia, and Lenore was coming to terms with her brother’s death during the war, and hoping to travel to America to meet up with her childhood friend. I did find these interlocking stories quite interesting, and I found myself wanting to know what happened next, there was something missing for me though.

    The ending to the story was okay, and I was pleased that we got to find out what happened to each of the girls, and how their stories tied together.

    6.5 out of 10

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